1400 Washington AveAlbanyNY
1400 Washington AveAlbanyNY

Center for Law and Justice Records

1985-2000

PDF Version

Abstract

In the summer of 1984, Jessie Davis, a young Black man was shot and killed by police in his Arbor Hill apartment. His killing served to galvanize the African-American community in Albany to seek change in the way the Police Department treated community residents. One outgrowth of the community's outrage over the killing was the birth of The Center for Law and Justice in 1985. The Center helped to keep the case before the public, gave moral support to the Davis family, assisted attorneys with a federal lawsuit against the city, and organized community demonstrations and fundraising events to cover legal expenses related to the family's suit. The Center's overall mission has been to promote the empowerment of people to change what they believed was the oppressive nature of the total criminal justice system, although the organization has continued to focus much of its work on policing issues. Dr. Alice P. Green, founder and Executive Director of the Center for Law and Justice, Inc. donated 13 boxes of records to the M.E. Grenander Special Collections and Archives at the University at Albany Library in June 2000. In November 2000, three more boxes were donated.

Summary

Creator:
Center for Law and Justice (Albany, N.Y.)
Date Coverage:
1985-2000
Quantity:
12.75 cubic ft. (about 12.75 boxes)  (40 boxes)

Administrative: Center for Law and Justice, Inc.

[The information in the Administrative History for both the Center and Dr. Green was taken from the Center for Law and Justice website: http://www.timesunion.com/communities/cflg/ (accessed 2000)].

In the summer of 1984, Jessie Davis, a young Black man was shot and killed by police in his Arbor Hill apartment. His killing served to galvanize the African-American community in Albany to seek change in the way the Police Department treated community residents. One outgrowth of the community's outrage over the killing was the birth of The Center for Law and Justice in 1985. The Center helped to keep the case before the public, gave moral support to the Davis family, assisted attorneys with a federal lawsuit against the city, and organized community demonstrations and fundraising events to cover legal expenses related to the family's suit. The Center's overall mission has been to promote the empowerment of people to change what they believed was the oppressive nature of the total criminal justice system, although the organization has continued to focus much of its work on policing issues.

The Center, located in downtown Albany, New York, has primary target areas of service in Albany, Schenectady and Rensselaer counties. However, it responds to requests for information and assistance from people across the state and country. Early on, the Center subsisted primarily on private donations and small local foundation grants. For the past five years, the United Way has been an important funding source. In addition, the Albany Housing Authority contracts with the Center to provide crime and drug prevention services to its residents. Volunteers and student interns from the regional colleges and universities also make a valuable contribution in needed services to the agency.

The Center is considered one of the strongest advocacy groups in New York State for people adversely affected by the criminal justice system. The media, academia and the community have become dependent on the expertise of the Center in matters related to the criminal justice system. One of the major contributions of the Center is a published report that analyzes the relationship between the Albany Police Department and the residents of the Albany community. In addition, the Center has studied and responded to almost every major issue relating to criminal justice including racial profiling, community and police relations, citizen police review board, death penalty issues, parole changes, families of prisoners, and sentencing. The Center also coordinates special events for Martin Luther King Day to raise the consciousness of people about the treatment of individuals affected by the criminal justice system.

The Center for Law and Justice, Inc. was first called the Albany Justice Center, Inc. The name was officially changed with the New York Department of State in the summer of 1990. [See the organization's constitution and other documentation in Series 1, Box 2, Folder 6. (United Way grant)]. The Center's activities range from client intake, advocacy and referral to community conferences on crime and prison legislation. The Center also publishes three newsletters: The Advocate, a quarterly community criminal justice journal; On Your Own, a directory of community services for women; and Free Legal Services, Information and Assistance, a directory of resources in the Capital District.

The agency is made up of an executive director, currently Alice Green, and staff. In addition, the Center has a Board of Directors that includes four officers (president, vice-president, secretary, and treasurer) and a group of directors. There is also a Legal Advisory Committee and finally general membership made up of community leaders, advocates, donors, area residents, and prison inmates.

The Center for Law and Justice, Inc. is a not-for-profit, community-based organization founded in 1985 to address criminal and juvenile justice issues and problems that significantly impact on poor communities, communities of color, and other powerless groups and individuals. Supported by private donations, grants, membership dues, volunteers and student interns, the Center seeks to involve a diverse community population in carrying out its mission. Located in Albany, NY, the Center addresses criminal and social justice issues primarily in the Capital District Area. The mission of the Center is to promote the empowerment of individuals and communities in order to change social policy and bring about fair and just juvenile and criminal justice systems. The Center's three major goals are to:

1. Serve as a clearinghouse for legal, juvenile and criminal justice information, education and referral.

2. Provide individual and group-based advocacy that promotes social justice.

3. Support the social, economic and political empowerment of individuals, groups and communities. [Taken directly from the organization's information pamphlet. See Series 1, Box 1, Folder 14. (PREP Proposal)].

Biographical: Dr. Alice P. Green

Dr. Green is the Executive Director of The Center for Law and Justice, a not-for-profit community organization that monitors criminal justice activities, provides legal assistance and criminal justice advocacy' organizes efforts to change social policy and empowers poor people and people of color. Before she founded the Center, she was Legislative Director for the New York Civil Liberties Union. In 1985, Governor Cuomo appointed her to membership on the Citizens Policy and Complaint Review Council of the New York State Commission on Corrections. A year later, he appointed her to the position of Deputy Commissioner for the New York State Division of Probation and Correctional Alternatives, where she was in charge of strategic planning, policy, and information.

Dr. Green is an adjunct professor at the University at Albany. She has worked as a secondary teacher and as a social worker. For many years she served as the Executive Director of Trinity Institution, a youth and family service center in Albany's South End. While serving as Director, she founded the South End Scene, one of the longest published Black newspapers in Albany.

Dr. Green writes and lectures on racism and criminal justice issues. She is co-author of a book recently published by Greenwood Press. It is entitled, Law Never Here: A Social History of African American Responses to Issues of Crime and Justice. Her education includes a doctorate in criminal justice and master's degrees in education, social welfare and criminal justice.

An active participant in her community on policing, court and corrections issues, Dr. Green singles out her membership on the advisory board of the Fund for Modern Courts and the New York State Defenders Association, and her work as a prison volunteer. For her work in the community, Dr. Green has received numerous awards that include:

- The distinguished Alumna Award from the Rockefeller College, University at Albany

- Service Award from the Albany Chapter NAACP

- Woman of the Year Award from the YWCA

- Founder's Award and Community Service Award from the Scene newspaper

- The Community Service Award from the Albany Social Justice Center

- Tile Service Award from the Israel AME Church in Albany

- Shaker and Mover Award from the National Organization for Women

- Black Solidarity Award from Prisoners of Auburn

- Distinguished Service Award from the Prisoners of Green Haven

- New York State Bar Association Public Service Medal

- 1994 Victor A. Lord Courage of Convictions Award

- Certificate of Recognition from The Lifers' Committee, Shawangunk Correctional Facility

- Community Service Award - Walls Temple AME Zion Church - 1998

Center for Law and Justice, Records

Dr. Alice P. Green, founder and Executive Director of the Center for Law and Justice, Inc. donated 13 boxes of records to the M.E. Grenander Special Collections and Archives at the University at Albany Library in June 2000. In November 2000, three more boxes were donated. Two included prisoner intake information and correspondence and the other contained copies of the Center's publications, scrapbooks about the Davis case and board meeting minutes. The scrapbooks and minutes were photocopied and the originals returned to the Center. The collection is extensive and includes documents such as grant proposals, newspaper clippings, membership information, financial statements, photographs, legal documents about the Davis case and the ensuing lawsuit, and conference information. The collection also includes information on various prisoner cases that the Center was working on and letters from prisoners throughout the state. The collection begins with the founding of the Center in 1985 and spans through 2000.

Series 1 of the collection contains grant proposals from 1990 to 1997 that the agency applied for and either received, renewed or was denied. Federal, state, local, and private grants provided a large portion of the Center's financial security. Though grants were not always stable or guaranteed, the Center for Law and Justice had several that were long-term, supplemented by short-term funding. Based on the information in this series, the United Way is a substantial resource for the Center. The New York Bar Association also provided funding a directory entitled Free Legal Information and Services in the Capital District.

Two other projects, Project Prep and Project Embrace were important parts of the Center's work. Project PREP (1994-95) was a crime prevention program for poor young people who often did not readily receive the nurturing or information they needed to develop into responsible, law-abiding and contributing citizens. The program consisted of a curriculum that included cultural education, positive survival skills, and nonviolent empowerment programs. [See "Center for Law and Justice Programs", Series 1, Box 1, Folder 14]. The primary goal of Project Embrace: An Outreach Model to Prevent Violence (1990-97) was to broaden community understanding about the nature and source of violent behavior. It also promoted the perspective that much of the violence addressed by the criminal justice system should be recognized as a public health issue. [See the Executive Summary of the Project Embrace submitted proposal in Series 1, Box 2, Folder 1].

Grants were solicited from government agencies and private corporations including the Albany City School District, Albany Housing Authority, Center for Economic Growth, Chase Manhattan Bank, Chemical Bank, Combined Federal Campaign, Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Life Insurance, Mohawk-Hudson Community Foundation, NAACP, New York Bar Association, State Employees Federated Appeal, TJMaxx, United Way, and WMHT Telecommunications. Some of the projects included, Holding Our Own, Mechanic Assistance Program (MAP), Prevention and Empowerment Project (PREP), Project Embrace, Project Vote, and the Safe Schools Grant.

Series 2 contains membership information spanning from 1992 to 1997. The series is restricted because it contains personal information about prison inmates, who made up the bulk of the Center's membership. Some letters concerned their individual cases. The series also includes form letters from the Center soliciting membership and blank membership forms. Many of the membership forms include copies of checks paid to the Center for yearly dues. Many of the forms came with notes and letters to Alice Green expressing thanks and appreciation for all of the work the Center has done.

Series 3 encompasses the various tasks and planning activities that surround the Capital District Community Conference on Crime and Criminal Justice. The series includes detailed information for the first four conferences, 1991-1994, and the programs for the fifth and sixth conferences. A survey for the 1995 conference may be found in Series 4 (Subject Files) under miscellaneous.

The Center for Law and Justice, Inc. began sponsoring annual conferences on May 18, 1991. The goal of the conferences was to bring together law enforcement officials, human rights advocates, and community members to address a wide range of controversial issues concerning bias in the criminal justice system and its impact on people of color, women, children and other groups. The conferences were one-day events, with keynote speakers, educational workshops, and strategy sessions. [In press release issued by The Center prior to the Conference. See Series 3, Box 1, Folder 2].

Series 4 contains subject files spanning from 1982 to 1984 and 1990 to 1993. Series 4 is primarily made up of official correspondence, both incoming and outgoing. The correspondence ranges from thank you letters to invitations for special events and also includes personal letters to/from local agencies, universities, leaders and activists. There are a few letters from inmates in these files, however that kind of correspondence is almost entirely found in Series 5. The correspondence in the series is from 1990 to 1993. Other subject files include information on Albany Law School, CAARV (Community Action Against Racism and Violence), the Community Police Board, Dr. Green's doctoral dissertation, financial statements, insurance information, syllabi for a course entitled Law and the Black Community (a course Dr. Green was teaching).

Series 5 is probably the most interesting and poignant piece of the collection. Prisoner Intakes and Letters, 1988-1998 consists of prisoner intake files that primarily contain letters from the prisoners to Alice Green or to her staff. You can also find letters responding to the prisoners' inquiries and/or needs from Alice Green and her staff. The correspondence ranges from letters of introduction, explaining why they were incarcerated in the first place and what services or information they seek from the Center to Christmas cards. Some of the letters come from family members advocating on behalf of a loved one in prison. Most of those letters are from mothers and wives. The correspondence contains very personal information on the inmates and sometimes on the people they victimized or allegedly victimized, which is why the series is restricted.

Series 6 contains a collection of newspaper clippings that The Center for Law and Justice maintained about issues and events that affected the criminal justice system, especially as it pertained to race and the African American community. There are also clippings on the African American community as a whole, both locally and nationally. The articles span from 1985 to 1995, though articles from pre-85 and post-95 may be found randomly throughout the subject areas. The subject areas include Affirmative Action, African American Families, African American Females, African American Males, African Americans, African Americans in Albany, African Americans in the Media, AIDS, Albany, Alternatives to Incarceration, Center for Law and Justice, Civilian Control of Police, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Community Policing, Courts, Crime, Crime Economics, Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice System and Race, Crime Prevention, Death Penalty, Death Row, Drugs, Education, Female Prisoners, Forfeiture Bill, Fourth Amendment, Grand Jury, Juries, Insanity Defense, Misconduct, NYS Legislature, Police Brutality, Poverty, Pre-Trial Release, Prisoners, Prisons, Public Defense, Race and Media, Race and Racism, Schenectady, Tenants' Rights, Troy, Use of Force, Violence, and Youth.

Series 7 is a small collection of photographs of special events held and sponsored by The Center for Law and Justice. There are some notable people from the Capital District that are featured as speakers or that are being honored.

Series 8 is made of the administrative files of the Center. This includes annual reports, legal documents, certificate of incorporation, tax forms, financial statements and board meeting minutes. The documents are incomplete and there are several gaps in time for some of the files.

Series 9 consists of a small number of Center publications including The Advocate. The collection of The Advocate is incomplete. There is also a folder of "publications by others" relevant to the work done by the Center. The Advocate is a quarterly community criminal justice journal. First published in 1992, The Advocate serves to inform and educate the community about the criminal justice system and how it operates. Regular features include the demographics of the state prison population, significant local and national criminal justice news briefs, summaries of important legislation and court decisions, writings by prisoners, book and film reviews, and guest editorials.

[The Center for Law and Justice Annual Report, 1998-99, p. 12].

The collection is organized as follows:

Series 1: Grant Proposals, 1990-1997
Series 2: Membership, 1992-1997
Series 3: Capital District Community Conference on Crime and Criminal Justice, 1991-1994
Series 4: Subject Files, 1982-1984, 1990-1993
Series 5: Prisoner Intakes and Letters, 1988-1998
Series 6: Newspaper Clippings
Series 7: Photographs
Series 8: Administrative Files
Series 9: Publication
.

Series arrangement statement: SUNY will complete.

All items in this manuscript group were donated to the University Libraries, M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, by Dr. Alice P. Green, Executive Director of the Center for Law and Justice in June and November of 2000.

Processed by: Rosann Santos, December 2000 in 2000.

Collection record created by: Conversion and encoding by ArchProteus,

Published: 2015

EAD file created, 2014

Archival materials can be view in-person during business hours in our reading room, located on the top floor of the Science Library on the Uptown Campus.

We can also deliver digital scans for remote research for a fee.

Access to this record group is unrestricted, except for Series 2 and Series 5, which has restrictions.

Copyright Statement

The researcher assumes full responsibility for conforming with the laws of copyright. Whenever possible, the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives will provide information about copyright owners and other restrictions, but the legal determination ultimately rests with the researcher. Requests for permission to publish material from this collection should be discussed with the Head of Special Collections and Archives.

Preferred citation for this material is as follows:

Identification of specific item, series, box, folder, Center for Law and Justice Records, 1985-2000. M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University at Albany, State University of New York (hereafter referred to as [shortened name]).

Contents of Collection

Quantity: 0.66 cubic ft. (about 0.66 boxes)  (2 boxes)
The Center for Law and Justice is dependent on various forms of funding including charitable donations and membership dues. Federal, state, local, and private grants provide a larger portion of the Center's funding. Though grants are not always secure or guaranteed, the Center for Law and Justice has several that have been long-term, supplemented by short-term funding. Based on the information in this series, the United Way is a substantial resource to the Center. The New York Bar Association has also provided funding to publish a directory entitled Free Legal Information and Services in the Capital District. Two other projects, Project Prep and Project Embrace were important parts of the Center's work. Project PREP (1994-95) was a crime prevention program for poor young people who did not receive the nurturing or information they need to develop into responsible, law-abiding, citizens. The program consisted of a curriculum that included cultural education, positive survival skills, and nonviolent empowerment programs. The primary goal of Project Embrace: An Outreach Model to Prevent Violence (1990-97), was to broaden community understanding of the nature and source of violent behavior and to promote the perspective that much of the violence addressed by the criminal justice system should also be recognized as a public health issue.This series is a collection of grant proposals submitted by the Center. Though the Center did not win all of the grants it applied for, this information provides insight into the kinds of projects that the Center does and/or hopes to do. It provides a window into the scope of activities and services required to achieve the goals of the Center. Grants were solicited from government agencies and private corporations, including the Albany City School District, Albany Housing Authority, Center for Economic Growth, Chase Manhattan Bank, Chemical Bank, Combined Federal Campaign, Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Life Insurance, Mohawk-Hudson Community Foundation, NAACP, New York Bar Association, State Employees Federated Appeal, TJMaxx, United Way, and WMHT Telecommunications. Some of the projects included, Holding Our Own, Mechanic Assistance Program (MAP), Prevention and Empowerment Project (PREP), Project Embrace, Project Vote, and the Safe Schools Grant.
Arranged alphabetically by grant title or agency.
BoxFolderContentsDate

nam_apap072-1_1

11Albany City School District1995

nam_apap072-1_2

12Albany Housing Authority1996

nam_apap072-1_3

13Center for Economic Growth1996

nam_apap072-1_4

14Chase Manhattan Bank, Racial Harmony and Diversity Program1996

nam_apap072-1_5

15Chemical Bank, Racial Harmony and Diversity Program1994

nam_apap072-1_6

16Combined Federal Campaign (CFC)1994-1995

nam_apap072-1_7

17General Grant Information1990-1996

nam_apap072-1_8

18Holding Our Own, Inc.: A Fund for Women1992-1993

nam_apap072-1_9

19Mechanic Assistance Program (MAP), Department of Transportation1994-1995

nam_apap072-1_10

110Metropolitan Life Foundation1996

nam_apap072-1_11

111Mohawk-Hudson Community Foundation1990

nam_apap072-1_12

112NAACP1990

nam_apap072-1_13

113New York Bar Association1996

nam_apap072-1_14

114Prevention and Empowerment Project (PREP)1994-1995

nam_apap072-1_15

21Project Embrace1990-1997

nam_apap072-1_16

22Project Vote1996

nam_apap072-1_17

23Public Housing Drug Elimination Program (PDHCP)1998

nam_apap072-1_18

24Safe Schools Grant1996

nam_apap072-1_19

25State Employees Federated Appeal1993

nam_apap072-1_20

26TJ Maxx1994

nam_apap072-1_21

27United Way Grant1994-1997

nam_apap072-1_22

28United Way 1994-1997

Donations, newsletters, draft proposals.

nam_apap072-1_23

29United Way, General Correspondence1994-1997

nam_apap072-1_24

210WMHT Educational Telecommunications1996
Restrictions:

Restricted.

Quantity:  1 cubic foot (3 boxes)
This series includes form letters from the Center soliciting membership and membership forms. Many of the membership forms include copies of checks paid to the Center for yearly dues. Many of the forms came with notes and letters to Alice Green expressing thanks and appreciation for all of the work the Center is doing. The majority of membership forms are from prison inmates in New York State.
Arranged chronologically.
BoxFolderContentsDate

nam_apap072-2_1

11Membership Applications and Letters 1992

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_2

12Membership Applications and Letters 1993

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_3

13Membership Applications and Letters 1994

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_4

14Membership Applications and Letters 1995

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_5

21Membership Applications and Letters, A-F 1996

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_6

22Membership Applications and Letters, G-M 1996

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_7

23Membership Applications and Letters, N-S 1996

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_8

24Membership Applications and Letters, T-Z 1996

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_9

31Membership Applications and Letters, A-H 1997

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_10

32Membership Applications and Letters, J-M 1997

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

nam_apap072-2_11

33Membership Applications and Letters, P-W 1997

Must consult archivist before viewing this material.

Quantity: 1.33 cubic ft. (about 1.33 boxes)  (4 boxes)
The Center for Law and Justice, Inc. began sponsoring an annual conference entitled Capital District Community Conference on Crime and Criminal Justice on May 18, 1991. The goal of the conference was to bring together law enforcement officials, human rights advocates, and community members to address a wide range of controversial issues concerning bias in the criminal justice system and its impact on people of color, women, children and the poor. The conferences were one-day events, with keynote speakers, educational workshops, and strategy sessions.Themes:1991 - Education, Mobilization and Change (May 18, 1991)1992 - Separate and Unequal: Racial Bias in Policing and the Courts (April 11, 1992)1993 - Effects of Prisons on Communities: Issues and Alternatives (April 24, 1993)1994 - Youth and the Law: Problems and Solutions (April 16, 1994)1995 - The Death Penalty: A Matter of Race (April 1, 1995)1996 - Criminal Injustice (April 20, 1996).
Arranged alphabetically within each year.
BoxFolderContentsDate

nam_apap072-3_1

11First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_2

12First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_3

13First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_4

14First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_5

15First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_6

16First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_7

17First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_8

18First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_9

19First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_10

110First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_11

111First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_12

21First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_13

22First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_14

23First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_15

24First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_16

25First Annual1991

nam_apap072-3_17

26Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_18

27Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_19

28Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_20

29Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_21

210Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_22

211Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_23

212Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_24

31Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_25

32Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_26

33Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_27

34Second Annual1992

nam_apap072-3_28

35Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_29

36Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_30

37Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_31

38Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_32

39Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_33

310Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_34

311Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_35

312Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_36

313Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_37

314Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_38

315Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_39

316Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_40

317Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_41

318Third Annual1993

nam_apap072-3_42

41Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_43

42Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_44

43Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_45

44Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_46

45Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_47

46Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_48

47Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_49

48Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_50

49Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_51

410Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_52

411Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_53

412Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_54

413Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_55

414Fourth Annual1994

nam_apap072-3_56

415Fifth Annual1995

nam_apap072-3_57

416Sixth Annual1996
Quantity: 1.9 cubic ft. (about 1.9 boxes)  (6 boxes)
Series 4 consists of official correspondence, both incoming and outgoing. The correspondence ranges from thank you letters and invitations for special events to personal letters to/from local agencies, universities, leaders and activists. There are a few letters from inmates in these files, however that kind of correspondence is almost entirely found in Series 5. The correspondence in the series is from 1990-1993. Other subject files include information on Albany Law School, CAARV (Community Action Against Racism and Violence), the Community Police Board, Dr. Green's doctoral dissertation, and a syllabus for a course entitled Law and the Black Community (a course Dr. Green was teaching).
Arranged alphabetically.
BoxFolderContentsDate

nam_apap072-4_1

11Albany Law School1991

nam_apap072-4_2

12-3CAARV, Community Action against Racism and Violence1992

nam_apap072-4_3

14Client ListsUndated

nam_apap072-4_4

15Community Police Board1983-1984

nam_apap072-4_5

16Correspondence -- Incoming1990

nam_apap072-4_6

17Correspondence -- Outgoing1990

nam_apap072-4_7

21Correspondence -- Incoming1991

nam_apap072-4_8

22Correspondence -- Outgoing1991

nam_apap072-4_9

23Correspondence -- Incoming1992

nam_apap072-4_10

24Correspondence -- Outgoing1992 January-May

nam_apap072-4_11

25Correspondence -- Outgoing1992 June-December

nam_apap072-4_12

31Correspondence -- Incoming1993 January-June

nam_apap072-4_13

32Correspondence -- Incoming1993 July-December

nam_apap072-4_14

33Correspondence -- Outgoing1993 January-June

nam_apap072-4_15

34Correspondence -- Outgoing1993 July-December

nam_apap072-4_16

35Correspondence -- Incoming1995 January-April

nam_apap072-4_17

41Correspondence -- Incoming1995 May-September

nam_apap072-4_18

42Correspondence -- Incoming1995 October-December

nam_apap072-4_19

43Correspondence -- Outgoing1995 January-June

nam_apap072-4_20

44Correspondence -- Outgoing1995 July-December

nam_apap072-4_21

45Doctoral Dissertation, by Dr. Alice Green1982

nam_apap072-4_22

46Doctoral Dissertation cont, by Dr. Alice Green1982

nam_apap072-4_23

47FlyersUndated

nam_apap072-4_24

51Jessie Davis -- Civilian Police Review Board1985

nam_apap072-4_25

52Jessie Davis 1984-1985, 1990-1994

clippings

nam_apap072-4_26

53Jessie Davis -- Community Response to the Shooting1984-1985

nam_apap072-4_27

54Jessie Davis -- Correspondence1984-1994

nam_apap072-4_28

55Jessie Davis -- Fact Sheet Concerning Jessie Davis ShootingUndated

nam_apap072-4_29

56Jessie Davis -- Grand Jury Report1984 August 23

nam_apap072-4_30

57Jessie Davis -- Justice for Jessie Davis Network1984-1994

nam_apap072-4_31

58Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- Affidavit of Anthony V. BouzaUndated

nam_apap072-4_32

59Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- Affidavit of David AloisiUndated

nam_apap072-4_33

510Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- Correspondence1992

nam_apap072-4_34

511Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- DepositionUndated

nam_apap072-4_35

512Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- Memorandum of Decision and Order1993

nam_apap072-4_36

513Jessie Davis -- Lawsuit -- Order to Show Cause1994 May 6

nam_apap072-4_37

514Jessie Davis -- Police Brutality in AlbanyUndated

nam_apap072-4_38

515Jessie Davis -- Police Standard Operating Procedures (Re: Deadly Force and Mental Illness1979-1982

nam_apap072-4_39

516Jessie Davis -- Press Releases and the Media1993

nam_apap072-4_40

517Jessie Davis -- Public Hearing before the Albany Common Council1994

nam_apap072-4_41

518Jessie Davis -- Scrapbook 1984-1985

Photocopied from a scrapbook that was returned to the Center as per their request.

nam_apap072-4_42

519Jessie Davis -- Settlement1994

nam_apap072-4_43

520Jessie Davis -- State of Settlement1994 June 20

nam_apap072-4_44

61Law and the Black Community (AAS 530)1992

nam_apap072-4_45

62Legally Speaking Workshop Evaluations2000 April

nam_apap072-4_46

63MiscellaneousUndated

nam_apap072-4_47

64Rights of Ex-Offenders Workshops Evaluation Undated

Restricted.

nam_apap072-4_48

65StatisticsUndated
Restrictions:

Access to the records in this series is closed to researchers. Please consult Curator of Manuscripts for more information.

Quantity: 5.33 cubic ft. (about 5.33 boxes)  (16 boxes)
Series 5 consists of prisoner intake files. The files contain letters from the prisoners to Alice Green or her staff. You can also find letters responding to the prisoners' inquiries and/or needs from Alice Green and her staff. The correspondence ranges from letters of introduction, explaining why they are/were incarcerated and what services or information they seek from the Center to Christmas cards. Some of the letters come from family members advocating on behalf of a loved one in prison. Most of those letters are from mothers or wives. The correspondence contains very personal information on the inmate and sometimes on the people they victimized or allegedly victimized, which is why the series is restricted.
Arranged alphabetically by prisoners name.
Quantity: 2 cubic ft. (about 2 boxes)  (6 boxes)
The Center for Law and Justice maintained clippings files about issues and events that affected the criminal justice system, especially as it pertained to race and the African American community. There are also clippings on the African American community as a whole, both locally and nationally. The clippings span from 1985 to 1995, though articles from pre-85 and post-95 may be found randomly throughout the subject areas. The subject areas include Affirmative Action, African American Families, African American Females, African American Males, African Americans, African Americans in Albany, African Americans in the Media, AIDS, Albany, Alternatives to Incarceration, Center for Law and Justice, Civilian Control of Police, Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Community Policing, Courts, Crime, Crime Economics, Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice System and Race, Crime Prevention, Death Penalty, Death Row, Drugs, Education, Female Prisoners, Forfeiture Bill, Fourth Amendment, Grand Jury, Juries, Insanity Defense, Misconduct, NYS Legislature, Police Brutality, Poverty, Pre-Trial Release, Prisoners, Prisons, Public Defense, Race and Media, Race and Racism, Race and Racism, Schenectady, Tenants' Rights, Troy, Use of Force, Violence, and Youth.
Arranged alphabetically by subject.
BoxFolderContentsDate

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11Affirmative Action1992

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12African American FamiliesUndated

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13African American FemalesUndated

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14African American MalesUndated

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15African Americans1989-1991

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16African Americans1992-1993

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17African Americans1994

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18African Americans in AlbanyUndated

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19African Americans in the MediaUndated

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110AIDS1985-1994

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111Albany, NY1992-1994

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112Alternatives to IncarcerationUndated

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21Center for Law and Justice1990, 1991

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22Center for Law and Justice1992

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23Center for Law and Justice1993

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24Center for Law and JusticeUndated

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25Civilian Control of Police1984-1989

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26Civil Liberties1989-1993

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27Civil Rights1990-1993

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28Community PolicingUndated

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31CourtsUndated

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32Crime1985-1994

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33Crime EconomicsUndated

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34Criminal JusticeUndated

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35Criminal Justice System and RaceUndated

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36Crime PreventionUndated

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41Death PenaltyUndated

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42Death RowUndated

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43DrugsUndated

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44EducationUndated

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45Female PrisonersUndated

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46Forfeiture BillUndated

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47Fourth AmendmentUndated

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48Grand JuryUndated

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49JuriesUndated

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410Insanity DefenseUndated

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411MisconductUndated

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51NYS LegislatureUndated

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52Police BrutalityUndated

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53PovertyUndated

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54Pre-Trial ReleaseUndated

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55PrisonersUndated

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56PrisonsUndated

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57Public DefenseUndated

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58Race and MediaUndated

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59Race and RacismUndated

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61Race and RacismUndated

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62Schenectady, NY1992-1994

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63Tenants' RightUndated

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64Troy, NY1992-1994

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65Use of ForceUndated

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66ViolenceUndated

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67YouthUndated
Quantity: 0.2 cubic ft. (about 0.2 boxes)  (1 box)
This series contains photographs of special events held and sponsored by The Center for Law and Justice. There are some notable people from the Capital District that are featured as speakers or being honored.Folder 1 includes a black and white photograph of Jonathan E. Gradess, Executive Director of the Defenders' Association. Gradess was honored with the Frederick Douglass Struggle for Justice Award in 1995. Included in the folder is a short biography of Gradess.Folder 2 contains 14 color photographs of participants from the Prevention and Empowerment Program (PREP).Folders 3 to 10 include 16 photographs of the Center for Law and Justice's first Capital District Community Conference on Crime and Criminal Justice. The event was on Saturday, May 18, 1991 at the Empire State Plaza Convention Center in Albany, New York.
BoxFolderContentsDate

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11Black and White Photograph of Jonathan E. Gradess, Executive Director of the Defenders' Association and 1995 recipient of the Frederick Douglass Struggle for Justice Award, given by the Center for Law and JusticeUndated

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12Color photos of the Prevention and Empowerment ProgramUndated

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13-101991 Conference1991
Quantity: 0.17 cubic ft. (about 0.17 boxes)  (1 box)
Series 8 is made of the administrative files of the Center. This includes annual reports, legal documents, certificate of incorporation, tax forms, financial statements and board meeting minutes. The documents are incomplete and there are several gaps in time for some of the files.
BoxFolderContentsDate

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11Annual Reports1994-2000

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12Board of DirectorsUndated

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13Board Meeting Minutes1991-2000

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14BylawsUndated

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15Center for Law and Justice, Inc.Undated

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16Financial Statements1990-1991

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17Insurance1991

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18Legal Documents 1990

(includes IRS forms, Certificate of Incorporation, etc.).

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19MissionUndated
Quantity: 0.33 cubic ft. (about 0.33 boxes)  (1 box)
Series 9 consists of a small number of Center publications including The Advocate. The collection of The Advocate is incomplete. There is also a folder of publications by others, relevant to some of the work done by the Center. The Advocate is a quarterly community criminal justice journal. First published in 1992, the Advocate serves to inform and educate the community about the criminal justice system and how it operates. Regular features include the demographics of the state prison population, significant local and national criminal justice news briefs, summaries of important legislation and court decisions, writings by prisoners, book and film reviews, and guest editorials.
BoxFolderContentsDate

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11 Advocate 1992-1996

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12 Advocate 1997-2000

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13 Did You Know? Some General Legal Concepts Undated

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14 Do We Need More Prisons? Undated

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15Newsletter Articles1991

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16 On Your Own: Free Legal Information and Services in the Capital District Undated

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17Publications by OthersUndated

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18 Repairing the Breach: Key Ways to Support Family Life, Reclaim Our Streets and Rebuild Civil Society in America's Communities 1996

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19 Street Smart: Your Legal Rights on the Street Undated

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110 To Protect and Serve? A Status Report on the Relationship between the Community and the Albany Police Department 1998 June